CfP: 40th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts (ICFA) Thumbnail

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Posted by Timothy Jones on August 28, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

March 13-17, 2019 at the Marriott Orlando Airport Hotel. The deadline for submitting proposals is October 31, 2018. Please join us for ICFA 40, March 13-17, 2019, when our theme will be “Politics and Conflict.” We welcome papers on the work of: Guest Scholar Mark Bould (Reader, University of the West of England; winner of the SFRA Pilgrim Award; author of several books on sf including Science Fiction: The Routledge Film Guidebook) and Guest Author G. Willow Wilson (winner of a PEN Center award; writer of the Hugo-Award-winning series Ms. Marvel, author of Alif the Unseen). Specul

Lacan and Dracula Thumbnail

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Posted by Timothy Jones on August 23, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , ,

By Josephine Sharoni   Already in 1958 the literary critic,  Maurice Richardson commented that the set up in Bram Stoker’s Dracula reminded him of the primal horde,’pictured somewhat fantastically’  by Freud in Totem and Taboo, ‘with the brothers banding together against the father who has tried to keep all the females to himself’.  It then turns out that several other literary works from this same period also look rather like Totem and Taboo. The Lost World (1912) by Arthur Conan Doyle, H. G. Wells’ The Invisible Man (1897) and She by Henry Rider Haggard (1887) to ta

From Iron Man Back to Trashman: Exploring the Science Fiction and Gothic History of Comics and Graphic Novels Thumbnail

From Iron Man Back to Trashman: Exploring the Science Fiction and Gothic History of Comics and Graphic Novels

Posted by Stuart Lindsay on June 21, 2018 in 7013594489 tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  Keith A. Spencer writes: ‘In both neoliberalism and superhero movies, politics and big political decisions happen because the elite (politicians or superpeople or supervillains) make them happen. Society is ruled over by benevolent philosopher-kings (plutocrats or superheroes both) who watch over us and aid only when needed’.¹ He furthers this conflation of individualism and neoliberalism in the superhero movie by claiming that ‘there will never be a superhero who originates from a robust democracy or an anarchist commune, because those societies don’t create individual

The Sepulchre by the Sea: Repressing the Violent History of New Zealand in Sydney Bridge Upside Down Thumbnail

The Sepulchre by the Sea: Repressing the Violent History of New Zealand in Sydney Bridge Upside Down

Posted by Timothy Jones on June 13, 2018 in (323) 245-6693 tagged with

By Edith Paton Ian Conrich portrays the New Zealand landscape as one of concealment: a green, clean paradise with a dark and treacherous underbelly. He goes on to say that national literature and popular opinion point to this dichotomous topography.[1]  If then what lies beneath is hidden, the land itself can be viewed as representative of a crypt in which the despair, isolation and loss which encapsulates the nation’s literature[2] is concealed.  In her introduction to Jean Devanny’s banned novel The Butcher Shop (1926) Heather Roberts asserts that violence in the New Zealand novel i

Sex in the Slaughterhouse: Sexual Repression and Meat in Sydney Bridge Upside Down Thumbnail

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Posted by Timothy Jones on May 09, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with , , ,

By Edith Paton In Whole Men: The Masculine Tradition in New Zealand Literature, Kai Jensen asserts that ‘The male body seems a straightforward physical entity, yet literature may filter perceptions even here. Size, strength and […] sexual vigour tend to be attributes of the ideal New Zealand man’ and ‘[b]oys are said to feel social pressure to enlarge and strengthen their bodies.’ [1]  This understanding of New Zealand masculinity and how it is conflated with the physical body is crucial to Ballantyne’s novel.  A novel not only concerned with sexual maturation and masculinity,

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(757) 874-8585

Posted by Timothy Jones on April 18, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

A Narrative of Repression: Tracing Origin in David Ballantyne’s Sydney Bridge Upside Down By Edith Paton The setting is Calliope Bay, an isolated town on the edge of New Zealand with an abandoned slaughterhouse looming on the outskirts. The residents are seen only through the eyes of a troubled narrator, an adolescent killer who tries to both navigate and conceal the intentions of both himself and those around him.  By leading the reader on a labyrinthine trail through a summer of secrecy, sex and murder, Ballantyne’s narrator acts as a means of repressing the truth, obfuscating ori

CfP: Gothic Pasts, Gothic Futures Thumbnail

(844) 483-2791

Posted by Timothy Jones on April 12, 2018 in 402-974-5302 tagged with , ,

Very excited to announce a CfP for this event at Stirling - celebrating thirty years of the Gothic Imagination programme! Call for Papers: Gothic Pasts, Gothic Futures: A Symposium Celebrating 30 Years of Gothic Studies at the University of Stirling Friday 26 October 2018, University of Stirling   Gothic Studies at the University of Stirling is celebrating its 30th anniversary. To mark the occasion, we are holding a symposium that explores the Gothic, the past and the future, as part of a programme of Gothic events in 2018-19. We live in Gothic times. The past, critic

CFP: The Fates of Frankenstein Thumbnail

CFP: The Fates of Frankenstein

Posted by Timothy Jones on April 12, 2018 in (819) 789-9278 tagged with ,

Conference: The Fates of Frankenstein 23-24 November 2018, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh 2018 sees a flourishing crop of events commemorating, one way or another, the bicentenary of Frankenstein’s publication. The Fates of Frankenstein is a two-day conference about adaptations and appropriations of Shelley’s novel. The fate of Frankenstein and his monstrous creation has been to outlive their original context. Indeed, Frankenstein almost immediately escaped its book covers into Richard Brinsley Peake’s 1823 stage adaptation, Presumption; or, the Fate of Frankenstein. Two hund

(248) 886-0206

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Posted by Timothy Jones on April 11, 2018 in Uncategorized tagged with ,

Last month, I had the opportunity to speak with novelist Phil Rickman as part of his BBC Radio Wales book programme, in an episode titled ‘Can horror fiction return from the dead?’. Its theme, as the title suggests, was horror’s sudden decline in popularity after the boom of the 1980s—a grisly case of ‘genre-cide,’ as Phil put it—as well as its future prospects for revivification. After an interview with Owen King—whose collaboration with his famous father (Sleeping Beauties) was in the end summed up as ‘occasionally a bit scary...but not horror’—Phil spoke with a pair of

Cinema’s First Vampires: Theodor and Leo Wharton’s The Mysteries of Myra and Alexander Korda’s Mágia Thumbnail

Cinema’s First Vampires: Theodor and Leo Wharton’s The Mysteries of Myra and Alexander Korda’s Mágia

Posted by 719-663-1943 on February 20, 2018 in color-matching tagged with , ,

Vampire: ‘a preternatural being of malignant nature (in the original and usual form of the belief, a re-animated corpse), supposed to seek nourishment, or do harm, by sucking the blood of sleeping persons; a  man or woman abnormally endowed with similar habits.’ OED In searching for the cinema’s first vampires, it is wise to go back to basics. Though we might identify unnatural longevity, castles, bats and an aversion to sunlight and stakes with vampirism, it is clear that the consumption of blood is a decisive factor yet it is significant that the  above description stops short of